Healthy Living

Articles to Better Your Health

Protecting Your Skin


article by:
Reliv International
www.reliv.com

Protecting Your Skin

As teenagers, many of us scoffed at the idea of wearing sunscreen and reached for zero-protection, greasy baby oil instead. We sizzled and fried in the pursuit of the perfect tan. Our skin paid the price and today the sun damage is reflected in brown age spots, more pronounced wrinkling, leathery skin, or worse — skin cancer.

Sun damage is caused by two types of ultraviolet radiation (UV). While UVB rays are the main cause of sunburn, UVA rays are the most damaging. These stronger rays penetrate the deeper layer of skin and break down collagen and elastin. The result: wrinkles, sagging skin and age spots.

UVA rays, present throughout the year, are also the chief cause of skin cancers. The rays can penetrate clouds and windows. Even on a cloudy day, 80 percent of the sun’s UV rays can pass through the clouds. Sand reflects 25 percent of the sun’s rays, while snow reflects 80 percent of the sun’s rays. That’s why wearing screening is essential — no matter what the weather.

How to Use Sunscreen

Despite your years in the sun, you can still reduce your skin cancer risk — and your children’s — by wearing sunscreen now.

No matter what your skin type, the American Academy of Dermatology recommends you wear a broad-spectrum (protects against UVA and UVB rays), water-resistant sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 30 all year round. UVA-screening ingredients include avobenzone and oxybenzone among others.

Sun protection can prevent premature skin aging and skin cancer. Here’s how to best protect your skin.

  • Apply sunscreen to dry skin 15 to 30 minutes before going in the sun.
  • Use one ounce (a shot glass full or 2 tablespoons) of sunscreen to coat all areas of the skin liberally. Pay particular attention to the face, ears, hands and arms.
  • Apply lip balm with an SPF of 30 or more to lips.
  • If you rely on moisturizer or cosmetics that contain sunscreen, be sure to reapply often for continued UV protection.
  • Avoid too much sun exposure from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. when the sun’s rays are the strongest.
  • Wear a broad-rimmed hat and sunglasses in the sun.
  • Avoid tanning booths. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has now classified them as cancer-causing in humans.
  • Examine your skin head-to-toe every month.
  • See your doctor once a year for a professional skin exam.

Choose Sunscreen Wisely
Relìvables Sunscreen SPF 30+ is an ideal choice to protect your whole family. It offers water-resistant, broad-spectrum protection — with avobenzone and oxybenzone — to guard against both UVA and UVB rays. Relìvables Sunscreen is also PABA-free. The pump-spray container provides convenient application without the waste of an aerosol. Since it’s oil-free, it dries fast without feeling greasy.

To protect your face while you moisturize year round, Relìvables r day balanced moisturizer contains SPF 15 protection along with Relìv’s exclusive RA7 nutrient complex that may actually reduce the visible effects of sun damage.

To find out more about these Relivable products contact me by subscribing to my blog.

Cheers!

Katrina van Oudheusden

Independent Reliv Distributor

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April 22, 2010 - Posted by | Health and Wellness | , , , , , ,

2 Comments »

  1. I’ve got to admit, the thought of wearing sunscreen in the winter or when there’s snow outside skeeves me a bit. But then the thought of skin cancer is just a bit more scary lol. Come on people! Slather that sunscreen on!

    Comment by ambience720 | April 29, 2010 | Reply


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